//
archives

Education

This tag is associated with 387 posts

Beyond The Templatised, Individualised Singaporean Notions Of Success

What stood out in the summarised experiences of more than 300 business undergraduates at the Singapore Management University – published in two volumes and which highlight many of their anxieties over success and failure (ST, Jan. 9) – are the templatised, individualised Singaporean notions of success, and the extent to which those who chose different pathways are held up as exceptions. Templatised, and arguably as an extension of our education system, because there are implicit expectations for students to adhere to predetermined pathways leading to stable lives and careers, upon which there are checklists to follow. And individualised, because besides the references to their parents or immediate family relationships, there was little to no mention of how they position themselves in their communities (and even in the country or the world), and how they may contribute to improve the lives of others beyond their personal circles. Continue reading

Focus On Access – Not Just Affordability – And Broaden Definitions Of Success

Absent from the recent efforts to increase the diversity of students at Singapore’s independent schools – through which students from low- or middle-income families will enjoy fee subsidies and could qualify for a scholarship for out-of-pocket expenses (ST, Dec. 29) – is a focus on access as well as broadened definitions of success. Put otherwise: In addition to improving the affordability of these schools for academically gifted students from low- or middle-income families, there are outstanding questions on the proportion of students who gain access to these schools in the first place, and on students from these families who may not demonstrate the same scholastic aptitudes, and yet have other talents or abilities which ought to be nurtured. Continue reading

Education, Employers, And Singapore’s Workaholic Culture

An understanding of Singapore’s workaholic culture – given that “Singapore residents in 2015 worked the second longest week in developed cities around the world” (TODAY, Dec. 22) – is not complete without examining the influence of a competitive education system and the role of older employers in perpetuating the need for long work hours, reflected in instances when calls for a better work-life balance is ridiculed as younger workers being demanding or mollycoddled. And because has been established that the long work hours in Singapore compare poorly to the hours of workers from other countries and that blue-collar Singaporean workers still work the longest hours, attempts to improve the status quo ought to focus on the root of these problems. Continue reading

Follow guanyinmiao's musings on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,373 other followers

Twitter