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This tag is associated with 48 posts

The Weekly Global Roundup: Unrest In The Middle East (December 24 to 29, 2018)

The Middle East continues to be marked by unrest and violence, with protests in Tunisia as well as attacks in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya. In Tunisia, the death of a journalist – who set himself on fire over economic conditions in the country – has led to clashes between protestors and security forces, and has led to comparisons with the self-immolation of a street vendor in 2010 which consequently sparked a revolution and the Arab Spring uprisings across the region. A gun and suicide attack in Afghanistan killed at least 43 people, a car bomb in Iraq killed three people, and suicide bombers in Libya killed at least three people. Continue reading

The Weekly Global Roundup: Uncertainty In Europe (November 26 to December 1, 2018)

At a special summit, the 27 remaining European Union (EU) leaders signed off the Brexit agreement with the United Kingdom (UK) after Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez lifted his threat of an effective veto, but UK Prime Minister Theresa May will find it challenging to convince her parliament to vote for the deal. In the same week, defence ministers of 25 EU countries also agreed to form a join EU intelligence school to deepen defence cooperation. In France, major protests against mounting gas prices and eco-taxes – which have morphed into a wider demonstration against the government – led to dozens of arrests. And in Ukraine, the country’s parliament voted to declare martial law in areas bordering Russia after a naval clash. Continue reading

The Weekly Global Roundup: Questions Of Responsibility In Asia (November 19 to 24, 2018)

A landmark ruling in Cambodia found two Khmer Rouge officials guilty of genocide, while disagreements between China and the United States – with different narratives of the disagreements, as both countries blamed one another – resulted in the failure of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) to agree on a leaders’ communique for the first time in its history. In Cambodia, where more than 1.7 million people died from forced labour, starvation, and execution under the Khmer Rouge regime between 1975 and 1979, an international tribunal found two Khmer Rouge officials guilty of genocide. And in Papua New Guinea, APEC failed to agree on a leaders’ communique because of deep divisions between China and the United States over trade and investment, and the chairman of the meeting said “the sticking point was over whether mention of the World Trade Organisation and its possible reform should be in the [declaration]”. Continue reading

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